BSA Social Aspects of Death, Dying and Bereavement Annual Symposium

BSA Social Aspects of Death, Dying and Bereavement Annual Symposium

13 November 2015
Methodology: Researching Death, Dying and Bereavement

Drawing on discussions from previous events where people have shared their personal experiences, this year’s DDB symposium will focus on conducting research in the field of dying studies. We invite papers that will encourage the audience to learn and reflect on any of the following areas:

*         Using research methods – including innovative methods (e.g. visual and sensory methods); mixed method studies; the use of quantitative  approaches to research; and auto-ethnography

*         Boundaries of research – such as what is regarded as a death and dying study (or not), and how these vary according to discipline; role(s) of the researcher and the researched; and the use of the ‘d’ word

*         Emotion(al) work – for example raising questions about whether researchers can grieve for their participants, and/or memorialise/ remember them; how researchers manage sudden death; the impact of bereavement on the researcher

*         Reflexivity – such as what this actually means in practice; how this can benefit/limit research findings; and issues of credibility

*         Identity – including that of the researcher and research participants

*         Cultural context – including different understandings of death, dying and bereavement and how these might impact on doing cross-cultural/comparative research

*         Research ethics – including gate-keeping; the perceived vulnerability of people in receipt of end of life care services; intrusion; issues of confidentiality; capacity and consent

*         Political context – such as funding (lack of?) for research on end of life care services/ issues

*         The power of medicine – such as the challenges of conducting research on death, dying and bereavement in a medical/clinical environment

Abstracts of up to 250 words are to be submitted by 5pm Monday 14th September 2015 toBSADDB@gmail.com<mailto:BSADDB@gmail.com>. Presentations will be 20 minutes long with additional time for questions.

The symposium will be held on Friday 13th November 2015 at the BSA meeting room at Imperial Wharf, London. More details about the study group can be found here: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/specialisms/DDB.aspx

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‘Marginal Death Research: Doing Edgework’ symposium at the University of York

The University of York are now welcoming abstracts for our ‘Marginal Death Research: Doing Edgework’ symposium at the University of York on, but not limited to, the following themes:

– Death in popular culture
– Dead Bodies
– Death and the visual
– Fashion and the dead
– Playing Dead/Dead Acting
– Social Media and Death
– Celebrating Death
– Undeath and the undead

Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words long and must be sent by Monday, October 5th 2015.Please forward abstracts or questions  to death-symposium@york.ac.uk.

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Family Troubles: Care and Change in Diverse Contexts

Family Troubles: Care and Change in Diverse Contexts
One-day Symposium, 16 September 2015, University of Reading, UK
 
REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!
 This inter-disciplinary symposium aims to explore family relations, care and ‘troubles’ in diverse contexts.The symposium will reflect on the powerful, often emotive discourses associated with ‘family’ in different cultural and policy settings and explore the (potentially troubling or troubled) changes, caring practices, and intergenerational relations that shape family lives over time and space in both the global North and South.
 
Parallel paper sessions will address the following themes:

 

  • Meanings of ‘family’ and (troubling) changes in family lives
  • Care and interdependencies in diverse household forms
  • Support for ‘troubled’ families
  • Responses to death and ‘bereavement’
  • Life-limiting illness, dying bodies and family caring practices

 

These contentious, emotive and sensitive issues pose questions and dilemmas for policy makers, practitioners and service users, as well as researchers and academics interested in issues of family change, care and support.
 
In addition to paper presentations, the Symposium will include:
  • Reflections on negotiated and constrained interdependencies within and across generations’: Keynote lecture by Professor Samantha Punch, University of Stirling
  • Caringscapes, responses to death and family relations in urban Senegal’: Presentation of findings of a Leverhulme Trust research project conducted by Ruth Evans, Jane Ribbens McCarthy, Sophie Bowlby and Joséphine Wouango and panel discussion with Dr. Avril Maddrell, University of the West of England, Isobel Bremner, Candle Project, St Christopher’s Hospice and other leading academics, practitioners and policymakers
  • Drinks reception
This event builds on earlier work on the theme of Family Troubles? sponsored by the Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance at the Open University. For related events and links, seehttp://www.open.ac.uk/ccig/research/families-relationships-and-communities/family-troubles, and watchthis podcast for a presentation of the associated book, ‘Family Troubles: Exploring Changes and Challenges in the Family Lives of Children and Young People’ edited by Jane Ribbens McCarthy, Carol-Ann Hooper and Val Gillies, 2013, Policy Press.
 
This Symposium is co-sponsored by the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Geographies of Children, Youth and Families Research Group, the British Sociological Association (BSA) Families and Relationships Study Group, the BSA Death, Dying and Bereavement Study Group and the Association for the Study of Death and Society (ASDS). It is funded by the University of Reading, the Open University and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Geographies of Children, Youth and Families Research Group.
 
Please register here 
 
    
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‘Death’s Summer Coat: What the History of Death and Dying can tell us about Life and Living’ reviewed by Dr Christina Welch

An interesting review by Dr Christina Welch of ‘Death’s Summer Coat: What the History of Death and Dying can tell us about Life and Living’

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Death and Dying video screening curated by David Lillington

I would like to plug an event happening in London in September at which a colleague of mine, David Lillington, will be screening a film he curated called Death and Dying. It looks like a superb programme so I’m disappointed I won’t be able to go myself!

 

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Mourners Make First Visit to New York’s Potter’s Field

Another interesting article, this time in the New York Times.

“The lonely island where New York City buries its unclaimed dead lies off the coast of the Bronx, off-limits to living mourners for so long that it has sometimes seemed like a mirage.

For years, family members and their advocates battled the city for the right to visit the unmarked graves of loved ones buried on Hart Island, the city’s potter’s field at the western end of Long Island Sound. The city refused such visits, with rare exceptions, citing safety concerns and the rules of the Correction Department, which controls the island and uses inmate labor for burials.

But on Sunday morning, under the settlement terms of a federal class-action lawsuit that sought regular grave site access for relatives, a small group was allowed to stand beside the very stretch of ground that holds their kin…” Continue reading the news story in the New York Times.

Since 1980, 63,484 people have been buried in mass graves on Hart Island. The Traveling Cloud Museum is a collection of their stories. For further information and access to these oral histories visit the Hart Island project’s website

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